Showing posts with label teens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label teens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label teens. Show all posts
Showing posts with label teens. Show all posts

Healthy Eating Tips for Busy College Student

You can Eat Healthy in College


Hectic schedules are inevitable for a college student. But studying hard doesn’t mean you forget to eat. Remember, your brain needs fuel. It is extremely easy and tempting to grab a cup of ramen or a pizza with a sprite and call it a day. However, this is neither feasible nor healthy. Great news!  It isn’t an impossible task to incorporate healthy meals into your busy routine.



Healthy Eating Tips for Busy College Student



Basic Nutrition


The basic food groups are something everyone is aware of. This will help you determine the amount and types of food you should consume to stay healthy. Eating healthy can be challenging, however, the consequences of unhealthy eating may be slow to occur but devastating in the long run. 


With issues like fatigue, depression, menstrual irregularities, gastrointestinal issues, and low immunity, “you truly become what you eat”. 


Most people are familiar with the classical food pyramid, however, in 2014 this was replaced with the plate. This showcased not only the recommended nutritive foods you should consume but also gives an idea about portion size.


However, keep in mind that the portion sizes vary greatly depending on your age, gender, and physical activity. For example, a college athlete will need far more calories compared to a chemistry undergrad spending their days in the lab. 



Recommended Daily Intake


Typically, a college student needs about 4-8 servings (3-5 for females) of carbs of which at least half should be whole grains. Protein intake of 45-55g per day is enough whereas curbing your dairy cravings to no more than three cups a day. 


Vitamin and fiber-rich fruits and veggies, thankfully have no strict restrictions, but the recommended minimum for 2-3 cups of veggies and 2 cups of fruits daily. Always keep various types of brightly colored fruits and veggies in your routine, because all these are packed with all the correct vitamins.



How Unhealthy Food choices Affects Us


College and caffeine are a tale as old as time. Deadlines, gruesome assignments, early morning lectures, or warm nights surrounded by friends, caffeine is a constant companion. However, constant caffeine intake is linked to insomnia, anxiety, poor concentration, and performance. 


Instead, try to sleep at least 7 hours (get off your social media past midnight!). Limit those caffeine cups to 1-2 per day and try to keep those all-nighters, only occasionally in emergencies and spaced apart.


Even though this is akin to beating a dead horse, fats are deadly when eaten excessively, it is a major culprit for cardiac diseases and stroke. Nonetheless, cheat days are allowed and moderate intakes are encouraged.


Whole grains are the better choice when it comes to carbs. Excess sugar is converted to fat leading to weight gain and is a major risk factor for type 2 diabetes mellitus. Low-fiber refined sugar doesn’t trigger insulin which stores away the excess sugar, the pancreas is unable to deal with the sugar rush, hence you crave sugars only hours after that delicious pasta.

 

Salt and preservatives, rich processed meats, canned food, and packed meals are at risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, and some cancers.



Dining Hall Tips to 


Planning is the best way to avoid giving in to your sugary urges. Browse through the dining halls menu online and decide your breakfast before going to bed, so you don’t buy meals with your craving eyes. Some college dining halls provide calorie counts for their meals. 


Keep an apple or some granola bars to your snack on your midday cravings and avoid the vending machine. Many healthy lifestyle snack options, like nut butter, crunchy seaweed snacks, and protein bars.


Try to keep a protein source on your plate as well as a fresh item. Salads are a great option and mind you, there is way more to salads than just lettuce. Choose grilled instead of fried chicken. Replenish your plate with veggies and choose brown rice over white rice.


Desserts can be fruit instead of sweetened yogurt. Replace your sodas with freshly pressed juices and water. Try different items on the menu regularly instead of sticking to a single item. Avoid lingering in the dining hall for long, don’t use the hall for group studying and projects. This will distract you and tempt you to eat more than you need.


There are many ways to make small changes to your diet which will make a world of difference only if you put your mind to it.



Dorm Room Cooking


Many dorms may not have adequate facilities for cooking meals regularly. In such cases, stock up your pantry with items like fruits, dried fruits, bagged salad greens, can tuna, whole grains (oats), yogurt, and popcorn. 


However, there are many ways to whip up easy meals for college students on the budget and drowning in deadlines. From baked salmon to chicken avocado, many easy weeknight dinners are great and take little time to make.



Microwave Meal


Microwave meals can also be healthy and quick to make. Scrambled eggs, lean cuisine, potatoes, can soup, single-serve quinoa, or brown rice cups can make simple, quick, and delicious meals. Top with seasoning and wash down with some freshly blended smoothies to keep you full for the day.



Eating Well on a Budget


Money is always tight for college students. The stress of college work can be so overwhelming that budgeting meals while keeping them healthy is the last thing on your mind. To help you here are some tricks to save your money and your health:


  • Make a shopping list for each meal during weekends and only stick to that.

  • Avoid buying expensive snacks like chocolates, chips, and packaged frozen meals too often.

  • Shop for fresh produce and meats on sale. Not expired.

  • Buy one or two expensive items like dressings and spices one at a time during each shopping trip to stock up.

  • Always keep cheese and salads, greens on hand to whip up a quick salad with any leftover meat or fish.

  • Stock your pantry with items that have long shelf lives to keep eating healthy. 



Establish an Eating Habit 


Two to three solid meals are a must, daily. Eat while you are slightly hungry and at specified times if possible with small intervals between snacks and meals. 


You are likely to eat more while starving, but frequent small meals will keep you full and functioning. Even if you can’t sit to eat because of classes or sleep, keep a snack to munch on the go.



Portion Control


Easier said than done. We all know that all college students are perpetually hungry. However, try to eat slowly and wait 10-15 minutes before the next round. Drink plenty of water and eat on a small plate. 


Furthermore, keep in mind that you can always have seconds later, so don’t pile your plate with everything in the dining hall or give in to that discount buffet.


A balanced meal of carbs, lean proteins, and heart-healthy fats with a rainbow of fruits and veggies is ideal. Try to incorporate this as much as you can, at least daily if not every meal.


Smart Foods for Quick Nutrition

Adding a healthy item or two to your meal will not only improve the nutritive quality of your meal but also elevate its taste. Here are some smart foods to add to your meals or to snack on throughout the day.


  • Beans

  • Blueberries

  • Dark Chocolate

  • Dark green vegetables

  • Oats

  • Salmon

  • Walnuts 


These tasty items also happen to be brain foods. So fuel your brain and get your gears working for that organic chemistry assignment.



Eat breakfast, even if you wake up at lunchtime


Running late for classes or oversleeping, we have all been there. Nevertheless, skipping breakfast for that isn’t the answer. Numerous studies have reiterated the importance of a healthy breakfast on classroom performance. 


On-the-go breakfasts like single-serve oatmeals, greek yogurt, hummus, hard-boiled eggs, nuts, and fruits are highly packed with nutrients.



Make sure you take exercise 101


Yes, we have all heard this advice and we hate it. But this advice is repeatedly drilled into people’s minds for a reason: it works. Incorporate exercise into your routine, like your classes you shouldn’t miss. 


Set up a workout corner in your room, walk to class, join a gym or join the college sports team or local fitness centers, the options are endless once you put your mind into it. Improved mood, sleep, and good memory will help you gain better results. 

 


Limit alcohol intake


The one beverage with absolutely no nutritional benefits and is detrimental to your health is alcohol. The occasional light drink during parties is acceptable but indulgence is a recipe for disaster.



Loss weight sensibly 


Starvation is never the answer to losing weight. You run the risk of developing eating disorders with fad diets and diet pills. Studies found no link between certain food combinations with weight loss. Instead balanced meals with exercise are the surest way to maintain a healthy weight. Remember health is not measured by the models and celebrities on social media and magazines.


Enjoy your pizza with half the cheese, baked potato, a regular size roast beef sandwich, or green salad. Forego the tasty trio: French fries, fried chicken, and fish sandwiches which are loaded with fat. This way you can enjoy fried food guilt-free.



Conclusion


The best advice for healthy eating is to take things easy. Keep your bones healthy with calcium-rich foods, stay hydrated and please try to sleep. All of these steps work in tandem to keep your mind and body healthy. Enjoy weekends thoroughly.


Gauge how your body reacts to different foods and adjust accordingly. Armed with the correct knowledge, tackle your next semester with a healthy body, sharp mind, and less stress. Remember, you can consistently score high as long as you are healthy.



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Healthy Family Advice

Can't We All Just Get Along?

The last few articles have been on the subject of mental health and the breakup of the family unit. As the family situation changes, so do the matters of family concern. Of course, how you deal with these changes affect the future mental health of your children, but don’t forget to take care of yourself. As mentioned in a previous article, “If mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.” My advice is this, self-care is a key element to a happy, healthy family, but be careful, don't over do it.

                                                  This post contains Amazon and other affiliate links.

healthy relationships how to get along self care  quote


If you’ve come off a long-term, unhealthy relationship, chances are you’ve been neglecting self-care. Self-care is key to your happiness. Newly separated or divorced individuals might choose to jump out into the dating scene. At first, it's exciting and new. If you've been in a bad situation, going out on dates and having fun can feel like self-care, but you need to be careful that all that good time fun having doesn’t lead to an even more unhealthy rebound relationship. Just like our children, we need to make healthy choices.

Practice being alone. I can’t emphasize this enough. Spend time alone. As much time as it takes for you to get over the pain. And as much time as you need to grow as a person. Learn from your mistakes and take care of yourself.  As I age, I see intelligent women jumping into relationships. Perhaps, they’ve been a stay-at-home mom. Maybe they’ve never held a full-time job. Some never had the chance to go to college. They’ve never managed their own finances. Often, they feel like they just can’t handle the responsibilities of taking care of themselves and their children. So, they go out on a man hunt. The goal is to find a better man than the last one. Some are looking for a man to meet their financial expectations, others are looking for companionship, and some are looking for a father figure for their children. Whatever the reason, they jump into a relationship too soon. Been there done that. 


Healthy Family


I got married while still in college. It was okay. Just okay. I wanted to be happy, but we were young and a lot was missing in the relationship. At that point in my life, the idea of a wedding was more important than the idea of a marriage. We were friends and companions struggling to find common ground, but something was always missing. Both of us had placed our focus on gaining knowledge and prepping for a career and little attention was given to intimacy. As starving college students, there was no money for fun things and then we jumped into buying a house, and then another house, and then it all just got way too overwhelming. There was simply no fun to be had.

Eventually, we talked to friends, family, and clergy. We attended counseling. It all pointed to the same thing, we just didn’t have the same goals or the same outlook on life. We ended the relationship in an amicable fashion. And that’s when my real troubles started. I briefly dated, but playing the field has never been my thing. Dating in your late 20’s is an experience that I wouldn’t wish on anyone. Ugh. It’s a brave new world. With my thirtieth birthday looming over my head, I really wanted to settle down and start a family before it was too late. I had some great men to choose from, two were truly amazing with interesting careers. One was neither amazing, nor did he have a great career. He was lucky to hold down a job. But he had what I wanted. A little girl. My family doctor and the counselor both advised against any serious relationship or even dating after the first year of a breakup, but my biological clock was ticking. Tick tock. Having been told I likely could never have children, I jumped at the chance. 

However, that wasn’t the only thing. He was fun. Oh so fun! He loved to dance, hike, bike, play sports, cook, and clean. One day, he called me one of the “cools.” I had been feeling lost. I was never cool. I wanted to do all those things I felt I’d missed out on in high school and college. Except I didn’t. I was still that goody two shoes inside. His risky lifestyle stressed me out. We fought. Among other things, he drank. He was verbally, emotionally, and physically abusive. It was like a dark movie from one of those cable tv channels for women. That was my first rebound.

After that, I wasn’t sure I was going to be able to pick myself up again. I had a lot of counseling. I saw a psychiatrist. I took various medications. Was I suicidal? Not really, but it seemed like life had gotten the best of me. I felt like a failure in every way imaginable. No kids, no career to speak of, and no real chance to recover from all the despair because, in my head, I was old. Oh, so old. I turned to online dating. It was uplifting to have so many men interested in dating me. It was also terrifying. That was the start of rebound number two. Not only did I not wait a year to date, in only a few short months I had moved in with a man and was pregnant. At the time, it seemed like he had everything I wanted. A good job, two kids, pets, a nice home. He was a widower and that (like the alcoholism before him) fulfilled my need for codependency. I had something to do, people to take care of, and dreams to fulfill. Except, we were less compatible than the previous rebound relationship. Shortly after my son was born, I became pregnant again.

Things weren’t ideal, but I always questioned myself. Why not? Maybe I was the problem. I should’ve been content. I was determined to make it work. I mean, after all, he wasn’t abusing me. He yelled a lot. It triggered old feelings from the previous relationship. I cried a lot. It made him mad. I cried more. It was an endless cycle. We barely knew each other. We met online. We were both lonely. As it came to be that he was my only friend for many years, we were really never friends. We both tried. The harder I tried, the more difficult it got. And now, there were kids involved. I didn’t want to break up the family unit. I didn’t want my kids to come from a broken home. Ugh, the damage I did to all of us by trying to stick this one out. We were the absolute opposite of compatible. I will spare you the gory details.

I had so many health issues. I spent months in bed, with nothing more to do than reflect on my past. I knew it had to end. But I was scared. Could I do it alone? Was I strong enough? I started stepping up my game, working harder from home, seeing various specialists and improving my health, and building credit. Once I knew what had to be done, I still wasn’t ready to do it. Things finally worked out in a way that made ending the relationship the most logical decision. It was difficult, but I didn’t need to seek counseling. I threw myself into my work, my writing, and the remodeling of my new house.

After years of thinking about it, deep down, I knew if I were ever to have another relationship again, I’d have to be strong. I’d have to take care of myself first, I’d need a break. I wrote down the pros and cons of dating. Months passed. I thought about what I wanted. What I needed, who I wanted and why. I realized I didn’t need a man to be happy. But I wanted that companionship that had eluded me for most of my life.


Why it's okay to Need a Man


It was always the same set of traits that had always led me to the same conclusion. But, I didn’t want to make the wrong choice with the right choice. So, naively, I  attempted to play the field again, but I didn’t date. I just talked. I talked to several old friends and acquaintances. This time no online dating, no strangers. I weaned them all out. I settled on one for an attempt at dating. We talked for weeks before meeting in person. I knew him from high school. He seemed to fit the criteria. But low and behold, it was a mistake. A big mistake, but one I wanted to cling to because I was sad and lonely. I had basically given up. I was about to turn fifty. There was no more time for mistakes. If I thought dating in my late twenties was hard - whoa. In your fifties, it’s a whole new frontier. Casual dating wasn’t an option for me. 

I took a few weeks to get myself together. I pulled out my list again, and this time, I realized what I always needed had always been there. Sometimes, you just need a friend.


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Emotional Issues from Childhood Follow You To Adulthood

Are Your Personal Intimacy Issues Affecting the Family Unit?

Is your relationship in trouble? Straying from our regular blog topics, we’ve been writing a series on mental health. Turns out something that sounds like a very adult subject matter, has a wider effect on our personal lives. Personal intimacy issues. Say what? 

This post contains Amazon and other affiliate links. All opinions are my own.

Emotional Issues from Child Follow You To Adulthood


Generally, when we think of personal intimacy issues we think about sex. However, personal intimacy can also mean emotional intimacy. Many people struggle with emotional intimacy and over time, this alone can break a relationship. You don’t have to be sexually active to struggle with emotional intimacy issues. In fact, emotional intimacy issues can contribute to sexual intimacy. 

Depending on your family situation, you could be setting your kids up for emotional disaster. How do you raise healthy, emotionally intelligent children? Obviously, if we had all the answers, everyone on Earth would be emotionally stable, but life happens, right? 

Depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, bi-polar disorder, and a variety of other common mental health issues can lead to a lifetime of difficulties in interpersonal relationships. If you can’t get along with family members, you’re likely not going to get along with peers or co-workers and your intimate relationships are going to suffer.

If you notice a family member struggling with interpersonal relationships, what can you do? The first step is to identify the problem. What is causing the mental health issue? It could be a chemical imbalance, childhood trauma, abuse, or even neglect.

If your children suffer, the next step is to get help. Whether you seek out a therapist in your community or find help online, getting an outside perspective is key to improving your situation. If the family dynamic is suffering due to personal intimacy issues between the parents, there are many resources online that can help. 

However, I know from personal experience that it can be difficult to get both partners on the same page. Sometimes, one partner would rather throw in the towel than ask for help from an outside source. I’ve been told that if you need an outsider to help, it’s far too late. Other people may feel uncomfortable or embarrassed to talk about their personal intimacy issues. For more information on common intimacy issues visit this link:  https://www.regain.us/advice/intimacy/common-intimacy-issues-and-how-to-deal-with-them/

When parents aren’t emotionally or physically connected, the children often face emotional issues as well, and can suffer from neglect. Parents can get so wrapped up in their personal problems, that they neglect their children without even realizing it. The key to a happy, healthy family is to keep all of the cogs working cohesively. Immediately after the breakup of our family, as they watched me fall apart, my children seemed surprisingly well adjusted. 

However, whether they knew it or not, they were holding it together, trying to be strong for mom. As time passed and I grew stronger and more sure about my own choices, my children began to show the after effects of the reality of a broken family. They withdrew, became emotional, and even aggressive at times. It seemed their entire personalities had changed in a few short weeks. 

Not only were we dealing with the break of our family unit, but the raging hormones of the wonderful land of teendom had conveniently coincided with it.  While there’s no good time for a breakup, note to self, the early teenage years have got to be worse. If I had to go back in time and do it all over again, I would do it sooner. My relationship with their father wasn’t good for any of us. Our personalities were not compatible and no amount of trying or counseling were going to improve it.

I struggled with perfectionism and obsessive-compulsive disorder, admitting the relationship wasn’t meant to be was extremely difficult for me. It took my children growing up and becoming reasonable, rational human beings who could recognize that the situation was impossible to repair, to give me the kick in the butt that I needed to move forward with my life. Unfortunately, all of this took a toll on their emotional well-being. 

If you’re facing a difficult situation in your relationship, don’t be afraid or embarrassed to seek out help. Don’t wait until the issues are out of control and beyond repair. Though humans are resilient, many mental health issues can get worse over time. Be sure you’re doing everything you can to satisfy the needs of your children and protect not only their physical, but also their emotional well- being.

 

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Teen Angst



Preparing Teens for Life after High School

How Your Teen Can Prepare for Post-High School



Your teen has spent the majority of their childhood getting an education. Deciding what they're going to do post-high school is often a challenge. However, to ensure that the senior year is less daunting than they expect and that they're ready for whatever the world throws at them, here are some of basic ways to prepare teens for things to come.

This post contains Amazon affiliate links.

preparing for future life roles after high school teens career choices


Look at College Options
Around 67% of high school graduates enrolled in college in 2017, and so it's extremely likely that your teen is looking at college as a viable future option. While this is an important stepping stone toward their careers, it's vital that they spend time considering the right college options. 


To do this, you should consider looking at Cornell University GPA requirements on CampusReel, among others, as this will help your teen find a college where their application is likely to be accepted. You should also take them to open days and apply for brochures that can help your teen find out what each college can offer them.

Take AP or Honors Classes
If your teen wants to stretch themselves academically and be in a good position for the level and type of learning that college offers, consider enrolling them in AP and Honors classes. Not only will these types of classes assimilate the types of projects that they'll commit to at college, but they can also help boost their qualifications and grades so that they can apply for higher ranking colleges and job positions in the future.

Visit Their School’s Career Team
One of the benefits of establishing your teen’s plan for the future while they're still at high school is they will have access to their school’s career team, who can help them plot their goals and long-term dreams. Not only can the team discuss a number of careers with your teen, but they'll also be able to give high school students advice for their college applications and help them find future work experience within the job sector holds their interest. Our local college career center offers things like: building trades, welding, nursing, childcare, broadcasting, and graphic design.

Study online to get a certificate in Early Childhood Education.

Get a Part-Time Job
Is your teen lacking in real-world experience? If you're concerned about how your teen will cope with their sudden entry into the real world, you should consider encouraging them to take on a part-time job. Not only will this force them to improve their time management skills by having to balance this job with their studies, but it will also allow them to boost many of the necessary skills for adulthood, such as independence and communication. It also allows them to experience working for and learning to follow the rules of other adults. So, it can change their attitude toward following your intstructions too.

Study for Exams

However, the most important thing your teen should do before they leave high school is study for exams, which gets them in a good position for their future, whether they want to go to college or go straight into the world of work. To help teenagers achieve their full potential, there are many resources online that can help teens study and excel at their end of high school tests. CLEP tests are great tests for college.


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YA Book Series Angels Supernatural: Allegedly Mystic

Allegedly Mystic YA Fiction Aurora Series Book One


Allegedly Mystic. It's finally here! If you're a long time reader of this blog, you know I've been talking about it for years. In the early stages, I even published some chapters here to get help with crowd editing and story line content.  (Those have since been removed.) This is the first in a YA Book Series about angels and all things supernatural. Read on for the book blurb and to see how you can read it for free. 

This post contains Amazon affiliate links.


YA Book Series Angels Supernatural: Allegedly MysticAllegedly Mystic YA Fiction Aurora Series Book One
Check out my Amazon Author Page, Lora Langston, and follow along there.



“Ugly people argue. When I feel ugly, things get ugly around me. I always want to run and hide in a bathtub. Unfortunately, the school frowns on unusual behaviors like that. My school counselor says I walk the halls with the grace of Snuffleupagus and the air of Pig Pen. Apparently, a cloud of woe surrounds me in typical Eeyore fashion.

Troubled kids who cause their parents shame, stress, or miserable pain often get shipped off to some kind of camp. Maybe Fat Camp, Betty Ford, or a Funny Farm? I could never be so lucky.  

Where’s a bathtub when you really need one? “

_____________________________________________________________________

(Teen & Young Adult Visionary & Metaphysical Fiction eBooks)

_____________________________________________________________________


Life is nothing if not unpredictable. Navigating adolescence is never easy, but when you’re born into a family of mystic medicine, every moment is a challenge. Aurora thinks she’s got a handle on it until her emotions get the best of her. 

When your feels affect everyone within a city block, you move every six months, and you’re labeled a weird homeschooler, having friends seems like an impossible dream. Having a best friend is completely out of the question. 

Romance? That's a stone that will never get turned over...

After watching her mother perform a strange ritual in the park, Aurora can’t help but think the story of her ancestry is a pack of lies. She’s seen all the movies about witchcraft. Whenever she’s feeling stressed, a green aura haunts her every move, a white cat appears out of nowhere, the school bully suddenly has her back, and she finds comfort in the companionship of a mysterious kid no one else seems to notice. 

Wondering if she’s secretly a witch, but doesn’t know it, Aurora opens up to her new friends and ends up confessing more than just her concerns about her fanatical mother and the green light. Her emotions always run rampant, but once she gets a handle on it all, she realizes those confusing feelings about her new protector might be more than just gratitude. She’s finally ready to sort it all out when her reservation to the Indian reservation is confirmed.

_____________________________________________________________________

Aurora's mother tries to keep her ancestry hidden. Allegedly born into a family of skilled mystic medicine men and women, Aurora, a home-schooled, thirteen-year-old, high school freshman, tries to navigate her special gifts as a mysterious green aura haunts her emotional outbursts. If she learns to contain her emotions, she can use her gifts for good. If she doesn't... Well, that's exactly what she's trying to prevent.  

Has she created the cloud that hovers over her every move? Is she a danger to society? Serenity Waters is the keeper of secrets. Aurora didn't ask for these alleged abilities and she certainly doesn't want to attend a camp to find her inner medicine man, but her mother is making demands and her mystic grandfather keeps appearing out of nowhere. It couldn’t hurt to meet her estranged father, could it?

_____________________________________________________________________

*The story is told from a thirteen-year-old girl's perspective with flashbacks to her mother's teen years.

**This is an upper middle grade fiction/YA fiction supernatural novel perfect for reader's 12-18 yrs. 


GET YA FICTION, ALLEGEDLY MYSTIC FREE WITH KDP UNLIMITED.


Here's the original cover from the YA Fictions Supernatural blog series. Aurora, you've come along way, baby. She is my baby. I've started the next book in the series, I hope to have it completed by Christmas. Things are going much faster these days, I've learned a lot over the years. 

Whether you're a future novelist or a seasoned pro, hop over and learn new things or share your books with my Facebook group: Author Friends (Historical Fiction Books)



YA FICTION SUPERNATURAL BLOGGER AUTHOR 





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