Read Free Books Online: Moon Magic Chapter 7

Moon Magic: YA Fiction Novel Online


Do you have an eReader or Kindle? Do you read free books online? We've been sharing our YA fiction book online. If you're new, start here- Moon Magic Chapter One. If you've been reading the story, the last chapter published was chapter six. Eventually, this will be published as an eBook. Remember this material is copyrighted and not meant to be published on any other website or platform. Moon Magic is a young adult fiction novel with suspense and historical fiction sprinkles. Enjoy!


Read Free Books Online: Moon Magic Chapter 7


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Read YA Adult Fiction Online


Moon Magic
Copyright 2017

Chapter Seven 
A History Lesson


You can’t protect your children from everything. Serenity had learned that long ago. She lived in constant fear for her daughter’s safety, so she homeschooled until the third grade when Auri had begged to ride a school bus like the ‘normal’ kids. It went well until everyone hit puberty in the fifth grade

Well, almost everyone. 

Puberty wasn’t typical. Nothing was typical with Aurora, so it took a little longer for the complete transformation. By seventh grade, it was nearly impossible to keep the big secret from her daughter, but Serenity did. At least that’s what Aurora let her think.

It was humiliating to talk to her mom (or anyone for that matter) about her period, hairy underarms, legs, and other hairy places. Difficult, but not impossible. Aurora kept secrets too. It was impossible to strike up a conversation about sanity. “Hey, Mom, I think I might be insane. Yep, I was fine until I hit puberty and then I started making people do crazy things. I don’t do anything really. I just feel. I keep trying not to feel, but this hormone thing makes that really difficult. If I could just feel happy all of the time everything would be fine. Everyone would be fine.” That conversation was never going to happen. Her mother would have her committed.

An awkward afternoon was spent hashing out the school day. Serenity had a series of safe actions in place to help keep an eye on Aurora. Every morning before school she’d ask, “Do you notice anything different or unusual today?” Aurora always had a smart aleck response, “I still haven’t started my period. Don’t worry, you’ll be the second to know.” 

After a snack of cream cheese and jelly sandwiches, Serenity felt energized to push a little harder. As soon as Aurora stuffed the first bite into her mouth, Serenity asked, “Did anything odd happen at school today? Did you feel funny when other people were around?” Did you notice any strange animals following you? 

 “Strange animals?” Aurora gulped down the last bite and shook her head back and forth.

If someone else had had a hand in her child rearing… Well, Aurora couldn’t help but think that she’d be normal. At least a little more close to normal. Environment can make or break a person. Aurora was broken. Her head filled with a scream, but she smiled instead. It was Serenity who needed psychotherapy. Aurora knew she wasn’t like the other kids- she just didn’t know how different. It was her mother who was obviously different. That much she knew for sure. 

No encouragement was needed. Serenity burst into a history lesson. “Did you know your great, great, great grandfather was a Native American Shaman. I think somehow our DNA is imprinted with the memories of our ancestors. I think maybe we see and feel things others don’t. The Creek Indians fought hard and most of them died battling for their land. The mess that followed, ‘The Trail of Tears,’ played havoc with our ancestors. The Creeks that stayed behind crossed over the Cumberland River and joined forces with the Cherokees and blended to stay on their land. They learned English and got along with the White man. They civilized to stay alive. Most shunned all of their ancestral beliefs.”

“That’s awesome, Mom. Can I go now?” Aurora jumped up to leave but was pushed back into her seat by the palm of her mother's hand. “Aurora, listen to me, this is important. Our white ancestors feared the Creek. Our Creek family was shunned and mistreated. The Creek Indians had a reputations of evil! To survive, they had to give up all that they were, all that they lived for, asking forgiveness wasn’t enough because so much prejudice remained. The Cherokee were good people, but there connections weren’t as strong. She stopped, gave her daughter the side-eye, and then screeched. "Aurora, do you know what I’m saying?” Aurora snapped back, “A bunch of boring crap, is there a point?”

Taking a deep breath, Serenity leaned in resting her elbows on the counter and and holding her chin in her hands. “The point is, Aurora, the Cherokee danced for Mother Nature but they didn’t know how to fully harness her powers like the Creek did.” Then, she looked over at Aurora and smiled awaiting a response.

“That’s nice, Mother, or should I say, Your Supreme Weirdness. And, big fat no! I haven’t seen any flying monkey or pigs following me home from school.


*     *     *

Aurora wished she hadn’t always been so rude to her mother. What if her mother never woke up? She’d be all alone and she’d never know the whole truth about her ancestry. 

Now, she longed to discover her true genetic makeup. As a teenager with no job or money and a lame arm, the best she could do was research online and with microfiche at the public library. Believe it or not, they still had microfiche machines in the basement.

She needed to get a DNA test. Todd Lowder, her mother’s boyfriend and her Social Studies teacher, had gotten one done. Apparently, he’d been told that he was part Cherokee. Isn’t everyone? Born mixed, half black and half white, he was anxious to find out if he were more African American or Native American or just another European hodge podge. 

Todd circulated a copy of the complicated graphs around the classroom. The results showed that he was mostly from some sect of people in Siberia. That could mean anything, based on current genealogy theory. It seems nothing is simply black and white, not even the color of one’s skin.

The oral traditions in Kentucky were strong. Aurora wanted black and white proof of her ancestry. Was she Cherokee? Creek? Everyone seemed to be part Native American of some sort, but no one had any proof. Serenity Waters had named her daughter Aurora Waters. Strange, but not illogical. However, Aurora might as well have been named Merry Christmas. Names seem to fit the traditions of the people. The only tradition this Waters family had was celebrating Christmas every year. Well, Halloween too, but Happy Halloween didn’t sound like a real name.

That wasn’t all. Aurora had been giving her mother grief. She wasn’t completely sure what Serenity was getting at when she had asked, “Do you feel anything unusual?” She did feel something, but what if her mother was talking about something else? She didn’t want to risk freaking her out with the wrong unusual feeling. Everything was unusual when you were a teenager. Then, there was the big, white, feral cat. He kept popping up all over the place. Outside the bandroom. At the bus stop. Whenever she felt overwhelmed, he appeared, but he wouldn’t let anyone touch him. He’d look up at Aurora, blink his eyes, purr, wiggle his tail and then disappear. Sometimes, she thought he was beckoning her to follow him.

When everything was deafeningly quiet chaos broke out in Aurora's head. She was fairly certain that she’d heard the so called Great Spirit calling her and positive that whispers from the ancestors tortured her. Maybe other people had the same thing but never took the time to pay attention? It was hard to be certain. What if those were just voices in her head, the kind that make you crazy? No way could she confess. If she feared she might be insane, what would everyone else think?  

If she did hear the Great Spirit what would people think? Buddha, God, the Great Spirit. Jesus, Zeus, didn’t they all have something in common? Human Spirit. Right vs. Wrong. Buddha and Jesus had both walked the Earth as men sent down by a higher power. Religion made Aurora uncomfortable. Other people called it different things, but Aurora’s mother had always taught her that God and the Great Spirit were one in the same. Serenity's bedtime stories had detailed how he watched over his people and sent down his helpers to guide them. Apparently, the Native American’s had learned to harness the powers that guided them. Maybe that was the big secret her mother was hiding.

It was time to eat crow. Aurora needed a plan. Unfortunately, Todd was  in the best position to help. She assumed Serenity probably hadn’t confessed to all of the weirdness in their lives. But, perhaps, she had told him about the Indian heritage and Shaman bloodline.

Todd had been Aurora’s favorite teacher up until he’d called her Mom about a quiz she’d failed. That opened the door for her Mother to ask about her school life and they'd swapped horror stories over dinner one night. The rest, of course, was history. He wasn’t Aurora’s favorite person. Odd Todd. “Easy ‘A,’ my ass, the idiots didn’t know what they were talking about." But, she was thankful for homeschooling, even if Todd had to help out. At least, she didn’t have to live with the constant snickers and glares from the other kids. Anyway, Todd would know how to track these Native American ancestors- that made him worth something.


Chapter Eight (If this isn't clickable, it isn't ready yet.)


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Lora Langston
Lora Langston

Lora is a homeschooling mom, writer, creator of Kids Creative Chaos, and Director of the Play Connection.